Affirmation: Immigrants and the Media


Not only has the immigration ban affected America economically, but it also has creatively. Two time Oscar winner  Asghar Farhadi, an Iranian director, boycotted the 2017 Oscars because of Donald Trump’s ban. He stated that his “absence is out of respect for the people of my country and those of other six nations whom have been disrespected by the inhumane law that bans entry of immigrants to the U.S., dividing the world into the ‘us and our enemies’ categories creates fear.” Many other celebrities made statements against the ban, including Yara Shahidi, daughter of an Iranian immigrant, Jesse Williams, who referenced Steve Job’s Syrian father,

The media is and was home to many immigrants, such as Rihanna, Justin Bieber, Salma Hayek, Audrey Hepburn, and Gloria Estefan. Specifically, celebrities such as supermodel Iman, who was born in Somalia, Paula Abdul, who’s father was born in Syria, Jerry Seinfeld, who’s grandfather was born in Syria, Iranian-American actress Nasim Pedrad, all are either from or have ancestry in countries banned. This proves that the immigration ban, if it stays in place, has the possibility to prevent future stars from entering the country. Not only are they famous for being actors, singers, or comedians, they also have contributed a lot to America through their philanthropy.

The ban also affected the promotion of new shows and movies internationally. Celebrities who are in America on a temporary visa faced danger of not being let back into the country. This would cause loss of profit for filmmakers. Additionally, it shows that no one is safe from the ban, it doesn’t only affect those abroad, but also those with more money in the country.

Below are some tweets from celebrities pertaining to the Immigration Ban.

Affirmative: What would America be without immigrants?

With the recent uprising and hype regarding the status of immigrants, many people have done research and reports on what America would be without immigrants. Many people tend not to recognize all immigrants have done for our country, and the strides and hard work they put in to get here.

There is a difference in the impact that legal immigrants have versus those who are illegal, but there is some impact either way.

Technology is a big factor in today’s society, and immigrants have contributed to it’s growth more than one would imagine. Without immigrants, out “unicorns” would not exist. “Unicorns” not referring to the imaginary creature, but the apps that allow people to travel from one place to another with simply the click of a button and the payment being connected to a credit card. Some common unicorns are Uber or PayPal. About 40 billion-dollar companies would not have been founded without immigrants.

If one looked at all the “unicorn” companies worth one billion dollars or more, 51% had a founder not born in the USA. Also, 70% of those “unicorn” companies feature immigrant workers that play large and key roles within the company.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

STEM is a technology based field that immigrants tend to lead, thrive, and do very well in, which may account and contribute to their creativity regarding app creation. They tend to hold a lot of STEM degrees which increases and helps when it comes to job multiplication. It is now statically proven that when there is one immigrant working in a STEM field, they are responsible for creating 2.72 more jobs.

Steam-Jobs.png

Lastly, immigrants are making strides in fields outside of STEM, and in broader areas of patents and inventions. Immigrants are involved in 76% of patents from top patent producing companies in America, reported to help mankind in many ways.

These patents are both technologically and pharmaceutical (medicine based).

Affirmative: Money Money Money…is on everyone’s mind.

donald-trump-immigration-banPresident Trump has hopes of deporting the 11 million undocumented immigrants living in this country.  He has made statements about deporting Mexican immigrants that are racist and bigoted.

“When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best. … They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people,” said Trump in a 2015 speech.

Not only is it racist and ridiculous to deport all of the undocumented immigrants living and working in the United States, it is fiscally impossible.  One of Trump’s consistent arguments throughout his campaign was that he plans to cut taxes without increasing the deficit; however, his immigration plan will do the opposite.

The Center for American Progress (CAP) did a study that found that it would cost the U.S. $200 billion to deport all 11 million of the undocumented immigrants, and then another $200 billion to keep them out.  This is just the cost of deporting the immigrants, and does not include the cost of the wall Trump is planning to build on the southern border.

The wall on the southern border, near Mexico, would also cost an exponentially large amount of money that is not feasible for the U.S..  Trump himself estimated that the wall would cost around $10 billion.  However, the Washington Post fact checked Trump and found that wall would actually cost $25 billion.

Where is this money going to come from?  Who is going to pay for the wall because Mexico has made it clear they won’t? And how are taxes going to be cut, while spending on immigration exponentially increases?

A Pew Research study found that 62 percent of people would oppose a wall on the border of Mexico.  The study also found that 70 percent of people think that the U.S. would end up paying for the wall that Trump claims Mexico will pay for.

Overall, it is fiscally impossible to deport all 11 million of the undocumented immigrants living in the U.S..  Even if you take out the factor that President Trump is being racist, he has no plan as to how any of this would be paid for.

 

Abby Harari

Affirmative: Trump’s Immigration Plans Go Against America Being a “Melting Pot”

Immigration is the process by which people come to live permanently in a foreign country. America is a place where people see lots of opportunities and tend to be drawn to immigrate to, which is why it has been coined as the “melting pot”. The topic of immigration has been recently talked about in the news and media a lot within the past year or so. Ever since the presidential election campaign began and the candidates were announced, immigration has been a major concern and platform for both parties regardless of their political affiliation. During his presidential campaign, Donald Trump advertised the fact that he wanted to build a wall to keep the influx in immigrants down. He also planned to tighten the laws already existing on immigrants within the country, and more specifically immigrants that are here illegally.

The president has planted a sense of fear within those who are immigrants on American soil. This is not good because not only does he blame the influx on the previous presidents, but he is making people feel as though they are unwelcome and do not belong. Since taking office, he has already attempted to put laws in place to build the wall between the Southern border of North America and Mexico, but his plans have not flowed very smoothly at all. He wanted to have Mexico pay for the wall, but of course they declined this action, so the president has been scrambling trying to find funds and people willing to pay for the wall. It has been a hard task for him to accomplish, because many Americans do not agree with these means of controlling immigration either.

According to the Pew Research Center, rules about immigration have changed a lot over the years, but America is and has been known as a melting pot for many years now. Immigration laws began once the United States won independence from Great Britain. Originally, the immigration legislation laws imposed limits that favored Europeans, but in 1965 the law changed for the better for immigrants from other parts of the world.

This law from 1965 was known as the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, or Hart-Celler Act. It replaced the national origins quota system with a seven-category preference system to emphasize the reunification of families and skilled immigrants. The visa cap was also eliminated from immediate family members of U.S. citizens admitted each year. In 1976, there were also amendments put into place which established a worldwide limit of 290,000 visas. This was put into place specifically in Mexico because the country often time exceed the 20,000-visa limit. These rules were put into place at a time where many other laws of freedom regarding civil rights and people of other heritages were being put into place as well, so it truly helped present America as the melting pot it is.

Imani Yorker